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May 2017 Archives

Avoiding harsh penalties for honest tax mistakes

The power of the Internal Revenue Service can be immense. It has the capacity to make life misery for anyone in Minnesota suspected of failing to meet tax obligations. The agency doesn't tend to wield that power right off the bat, however. An experienced tax attorney knows that actions don't tend to start with audits. First, notices of suspected liability are sent. If responded to promptly and properly, an audit might not even occur.

Tax planning in the midst of tax reform uncertainty

Confrontations with Minnesota or federal tax collectors are not something any business or individual looks for. Avoiding practices that could lead to needing to resolve tax disputes is something most experts agree deserves prioritizing. Achieving that aim typically requires solid tax planning, or as singer/songwriter, Carly Simon crooned about – "Anticipation."

Nexus tax web isn't untangling with passage of time

Back in the 1990s, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling that established that if a business has a physical presence in a state, even if that presence is a person, sales taxes apply to any transactions that occur. As we noted in a series of posts more than a year ago, this notion of so-called nexus hasn't stood the test of time all that well.

Gig economy growth has serious business tax implications

It's hard to know how large the so-called gig economy is and how fast it is growing. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics says current data sheds some light on the subject, but the agency admits it's unreliable because it's so old. One report by the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Program, credited by some as the most trustworthy, says the number of workers in the gig economy has grown by about 27 percent in the past 20 years. But who really knows?

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